Filter by

Price
0 11
Manufacturers
more (429) ok clear
Filter

Promotion products

Recomendations

3,3v - 5v voltage converters

Products: 11
Loading...

Logic level bi-directional converter, 4-channel - SparkFun BOB-12009

The module allows to exchange data between systems that use the most popular voltages levels: 5 V and 3.3 V and 1.8 V and 2.8 V. Works in both directions simultaneously. It has...
Index: SPF-02259
Index: SPF-02259
Shipping in 24 hours
In stock, shipping 24 hours!
(Check quantity)
Regular price €2.42 Price €2.42

4-channel logic level converter

The module allows to exchange data between systems that use the most popular levels of voltage: 5 V <-> 3.3 V and 3.3 V <-> 1,8 V. It works in both directions simulatneously....
Index: MSX-06117
Index: MSX-06117
Shipping in 24 hours
In stock, shipping 24 hours!
(Check quantity)
Regular price €1.78 Price €1.78

Logic level bi-directional converter, 4-channel - Pololu 2595

Miniature (13 x 10 mm). the module allows to exchange data between systems that use the most popular voltage levels ranging from 1.5 V to 18 V and Vice versa. Four channels to...
Index: PLL-02523
Index: PLL-02523
Shipping in 24 hours
In stock, shipping 24 hours!
(Check quantity)
Regular price €2.24 Price €2.24

8-channel bi-directional logic level converter

The module allows you to exchange data between systems that use the most popular voltages: from 3.3 V to 5.5 V and vice versa. Eight channels allow for connection of various...
Index: MOD-08590
Index: MOD-08590
Shipping in 24 hours
In stock, shipping 24 hours!
(Check quantity)
Regular price €2.68 Price €2.68

Logic level converter 3,3V / 5V - UART - Iduino ST1167

The module allows to exchange data between systems that use two popular voltages: 3.3 V and 5 V Ensures the connection of the UART interface.
Index: OST-14271
Index: OST-14271
Shipping in 24 hours
In stock, shipping 24 hours!
(Check quantity)
Regular price €0.95 Price €0.95

Logic level transmitter TXB0104 bi-directional, 4-channel - SparkFun BOB-11771

The module allows to exchange the data between systems that use the most popular voltage levels: from 1.2 V to 3.6 V for VCCA inputs, and from 1.65 V to 5.5 V for VCCB inputs....
Index: SPF-04290
Index: SPF-04290
Shipping in 24 hours
In stock, shipping 24 hours!
(Check quantity)
Regular price €4.84 Price €4.84

TXB0108 - two-way, 8-channel logic converter - Adafruit 395

The module is based on a TXB0108 system, it allows you to exchange data between systems that use the most popular voltage levels: 3.3 V and 5V. It has eight channels, it...
Index: ADA-02468
Index: ADA-02468
Shipping in 24 hours
In stock, shipping 24 hours!
(Check quantity)
Regular price €10.10 Price €10.10

Pixel Boost module - 3.3V / 5V voltage buffer for WS2812B diodes

The module is used to control the WS2812B LEDs, in the case of a microcontroller running on voltage  3.3 V. It includes a buffer that allows you to convert voltages. Module...
Index: MSX-08790
Index: MSX-08790
Shipping in 24 hours
In stock, shipping 24 hours!
(Check quantity)
Regular price €2.01 Price €2.01

Voltage converter 3-5.5V to 3.3V 2A - TPS62827 - Adafruit 4920

Voltage converter equipped with TPS62827 chip. It allows to obtain from input voltage in the range of 3 V to 5.5 V an output value of 3 .3 V with a current of 2 A . It...
Index: ADA-19251
Index: ADA-19251
Shipping in 24 hours
Available
(Check quantity)
Regular price €8.98 Price €8.98

Logic level converter two-way, 8-channel BSS138 - Waveshare 9127

The module is based on a BSS138 system, allowing to exchange data between systems that use voltage levels from the range of from 1.8 V to 6 V. It has 8 bi-directional channels.
Index: WSR-04486
Index: WSR-04486
Waiting for delivery
Czas oczekiwania: ok. 10-30 dni
Regular price €2.36 Price €2.36

Logic level converter I2C PCA9306 - SparkFun BOB-11955

The module allows for two-way communication between systems that use different voltage levels for I2C bus and SMBus. PCA9306 converts the voltages out of the range of lower...
Index: SPF-01709
Index: SPF-01709
Waiting for delivery
Czas oczekiwania: ok. 10-30 dni
Regular price €4.25 Price €4.25

TTL, or... a little electronic prehistory.

The development of digital technology has forced a change in the voltage standards in which newly manufactured ICs work. For many years, the standard for almost all digital electronics was the TTL system - both simple logic gates and the most complex microprocessors at the time worked on the assumption that the low level (L) is indicated by voltages from 0 V to 0.4 V and the high level (H) - from 2.7 V to 5.5 V. A considerable asymmetry resulted directly from the design of the input and output circuits of these circuits, based on classical bipolar transistors (as well as special multi-emeter transistors, but not differing in basic parameters from single BJT structures).

Thresholds and voltage margins in TTL standard

It is worth adding that the above mentioned logical levels concerned output signals - the inputs could work in a wider range, 0..0.8 V(L) and 2..5 V(H) respectively. The difference between the corresponding limits is the so-called switching margin - its relatively large width allowed for reliable cooperation of one output with many inputs, which - consuming some non-zero direct current - caused its load and, as a result, shifted the actual voltage on a given line towards the "center" of the range. Thus, for proper operation of the whole system, it was required that on no digital line the voltage - in any situation - should exceed the range of acceptable input voltages. The actual switching threshold was therefore somewhere between 0.8V and 2.0V - its exact value was different for different units, but the tolerance had to be accepted by all systems, described as TTL.

Modern standards

Today, it is difficult to identify one common standard of tensions. It is usually assumed that the margin is symmetrical and is usually 30% of the supply voltage (for both low and high levels). For example, a 5V power supply system can interpret voltages not exceeding 1.5V as low state, and as high state - from about 3.5 to 5V. This means that the output of a system supplied with 3.3V may not have a chance to properly control 5-volt inputs. In such cases a 5V 3.3V converter becomes necessary. Very often used nowadays logic level converters allow to choose the direction of the transmitted signal, although some versions automatically "recognize" which side of the circuit is the input and which side is the output. A willingly used solution is a circuit consisting of low-power MOSFET field transistors and a few resistors, determining their operating point - this design works perfectly well not only in "simple" situations (e.g. when connecting some 3-volt sensors with Arduino 5-volt UART interface), but also... in circuits based on I2C. The presence of separate pull-up resistors on both sides of the system ensures trouble-free cooperation of both devices, supplied with different voltages.